CRITERION: 3 Films by Roberto Rossellini Starring Ingrid Bergman

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3 Films by Roberto Rossellini Starring Ingrid Bergman
September 24th
Criterion
Retail $79.95, Our: $64.99
Stromboli (1950), Europe '51 (1952), Journey to Italy (1954)
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3 Films by Roberto Rossellini Starring Ingrid Bergman (Blu)
September 24th
Criterion
Retail $79.95, Our: $64.99
Stromboli (1950), Europe '51 (1952), Journey to Italy (1954)
Buy Now
Add to QueueAdd to Queue Top Priority

Criterion has announced 3 Films by Roberto Rossellini Starring Ingrid Bergman for release on DVD and Blu-Ray this September 24th.

The sets are listed as four and five discs respectively, and will have numerous bonus features as well as a booklet. Details below.


In the late 1940s, the incandescent Hollywood star Ingrid Bergman found herself so moved by the revolutionary neorealist films of Roberto Rossellini that she sent the director a letter, introducing herself and offering her talents.

The resulting collaboration produced a series of films that are works of both sociopolitical concern and metaphysical melodrama, each starring Bergman as a woman experiencing physical dislocation and psychic torment in postwar Italy. It also famously led to a scandalous affair and eventual marriage between filmmaker and star, and the focus on their personal lives in the press unfortunately overshadowed the extraordinary films they made together.

Stromboli, Europe ’51, and Journey to Italy are intensely personal portraits that reveal the director at his most emotional and the glamorous actor at her most anguished, and that capture them and the world around them in transition.

Stromboli (1950, 106 min.)
The first collaboration between Roberto Rossellini and Ingrid Bergman is a devastating portrait of a woman’s existential crisis, set against the beautiful and forbidding backdrop of a volcanic island. After World War II, a Lithuanian refugee (Bergman) marries a simple Italian fisherman (Mario Vitale) she meets in a prisoner of war camp and accompanies him back to his isolated village on an island off the coast of Sicily.

Cut off from the world, she finds herself crumbling emotionally, but she is destined for a dramatic epiphany. Balancing the director’s trademark neorealism (exemplified here in a remarkable depiction of the fishermen’s lives and work) with deeply felt melodrama, Stromboli is a revelation.

BONUS FEATURES:

  • Archival television introduction by director Roberto Rossellini
  • New interview with film critic Adriano Aprà
  • Rossellini Under the Volcano, a 1998 documentary that returns to the island of Stromboli fifty years after the making of Stromboli
Europe '51 (1952, 114 min.)
Ingrid Bergman plays a wealthy, self-absorbed socialite in Rome racked by guilt over the shocking death of her young son. As a way of dealing with her grief and finding meaning in her life, she decides to devote her time and money to the city’s poor and sick. Her newfound, single-minded activism leads to conflicts with her husband and questions about her sanity.

The intense, often unfairly overlooked Europe ’51 was, according to Rossellini, a retelling of his own The Flowers of St. Francis from a female perspective. This unabashedly political, but sensitively conducted investigation of modern sainthood was the director’s favorite of his films.

BONUS FEATURES:

  • Archival television introduction by director Roberto Rossellini
  • New interview with critic Adriano Aprà
  • New interview with film historian Elena Dagrada about the different versions of Europe ’51
  • New interviews with Isabella Rossellini and Ingrid Rossellini, daughters of Roberto Rossellini and Bergman
  • My Dad Is 100 Years Old, a 2005 short film, directed by Guy Maddin and starring Isabella Rossellini
  • New interview with Fiorella Mariani, Rossellini’s niece, featuring home movies shot by Bergman
  • The Chicken, a 1952 short film by Roberto Rossellini, starring Bergman
Journey to Italy (1954, 85 min.)
Among the most influential dramatic works of the postwar era, Roberto Rossellini’s Journey to Italy charts the declining marriage of a couple (Ingrid Bergman and George Sanders) from England while on a trip in the countryside near Naples.

More than just an anatomy of a relationship, Rossellini’s masterpiece is a heartrending work of emotion and spirituality. Considered a predecessor to the existentialist films of Michelangelo Antonioni; hailed as a groundbreaking modernist work by the legendary film journal Cahiers du cinéma; and named by director Martin Scorsese as one of his favorite films, Journey to Italy is a breathtaking cinematic benchmark.

BONUS FEATURES:

  • Archival television introduction by director Roberto Rossellini
  • Audio commentary featuring film scholar Laura Mulvey
  • New visual essays about Rossellini by scholars Tag Gallagher and James Quandt
  • New interview with critic Adriano Aprà
  • Ingrid Bergman Remembered, a 1996 documentary on the actor’s life, narrated by her daughter Pia Lindstrom
  • A Short Visit with the Rossellini Family, a six-minute film shot on Capri while the family was there during the production of Journey to Italy
  • New interviews with Isabella Rossellini and Ingrid Rossellini, daughters of Roberto Rossellini and Bergman
  • Rossellini Through His Own Eyes, a 1992 documentary on the filmmaker’s approach to cinema, featuring archival interviews with Rossellini and actor Ingrid Bergman
  • New interview with Fiorella Mariani, Rossellini’s niece, featuring home movies shot by Bergman
  • My Dad Is 100 Years Old, a 2005 short film, directed by Guy Maddin and starring Isabella Rossellini
  • The Chicken, a 1952 short film by Roberto Rossellini, starring Bergman
PLUS: A booklet featuring essays by critics Richard Brody, Fred Camper, Dina Iordanova, and Paul Thomas; letters exchanged by Rossellini and Bergman; “Why I Directed Stromboli,” a 1950 article by Rossellini; a 1954 interview with Rossellini conducted by Eric Rohmer and François Truffaut for Cahiers du cinéma; and excerpts from a 1965 interview with Rossellini conducted by Aprà and Maurizio Ponzi for Filmcritica

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